Monday, July 10, 2017

That Dead Seagate

Not Sure Why I Bought That 4TB external drive; my older 1 TB drive is quite sufficient.  But having duplicate copies is good.  Just plugged in some old internal drives now in USB enclosures.  The 120GB will save all my documents as well.  The 20GB drive is sort of a large and clumsy thumb drive.

Used TB hard drives are cheap.  Add a Sabrent enclosure and I can have as many redundant copies as I have USB ports and drive letters.  If you have any used but working 500GB hard disks you could not bear to trash, I will take them.

3 comments:

Eskyman said...

A common cause for Seagate drive failure is the PCB, and replacements are available. Unfortunately there's no guarantee, but if you're ever faced with the loss of irreplacable data then this may be your saviour.

http://vi.vipr.ebaydesc.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItemDescV4&item=332294895424&t=1494473347000&tid=10&category=16145&seller=pcbsolution&excSoj=1&excTrk=1&lsite=0&ittenable=false&domain=ebay.com&descgauge=1&cspheader=1

For any particular circuit board, do a search for that PCB part number. I'm glad that in your case Clayton, that wasn't necessary; you are a belt AND suspenders man!

Unknown said...

I can't necessarily say that I'm having better luck with brand-new drives than I was with retired/upgraded used drives purchased on ebay, but I did rather tire of the frequent failure rate of the used drives.

At least with the new portable usb drives the failure mechanism is obvious - "I was clumsy and dropped it." That at least makes it somehow more bearable than the dock with the "I don't know, it was working fine yesterday but now it is not" used raw drive that came from ebay.

Clayton Cramer said...

Eskyman: The advantage of redundant backup drives!