Friday, April 13, 2018

Too Disgusting to Even Summarize

Yale is paying a white, female rapper to perform.  This article about her at The College Fix discusses her "music" and is so repulsive that garden variety misogynous rap is almost uplifting by comparison.  The only quotable statements:
Earlier this year, Yale student Finnegan Schick penned an op-ed in The Daily News deriding CupcakKe’s work as “sins, not songs.”
“To call Cupcakke’s music ‘shocking’ or ‘vulgar’ is an insult to what’s truly shocking and vulgar,” he wrote. Her lyrics, he said, are “musical porn, plain and simple.” ...
Not every student is against Cupcakke’s upcoming performance. In addition the the Spring Fling organizers, Yale student Jazzie Kennedy supports the appearance.
In The Daily News on March 30, Kennedy defended Cupcakke, writing, “Part of being a feminist, in fact, is supporting women regardless of their preferences. Imposing rules and judgment only adds weight to the ball and chain that women are already oppressed by.” 

1 comment:

Windy Wilson said...

So, imposing rules and judgments on feminists adds to the ball and chain that women are already oppressed by.

This is the hypo agency anti-feminists point out in feminist thought. They aren't responsible for anything they do. The song "He had it coming" might as well be the feminist's marching song. What's next? If a woman unsuccessfully tries to kill a man, it's attempted suicide? If they aren't responsible for anything they do, how are they responsible for what society at large regards as accomplishments, and if those are only things the patriarchal society allows them, then aren't we back to the Victorian attitude of women as frail vessels that need to be cared for like overgrown children, and why do they still have the vote, and the Married Women's Property Act?

I remember about 30 years ago, there was a sort of Samizdat writing circulating among feminists called S.C.U.M., "Society for Cutting Up Men". I think it's that wing of the feminist movement that's taking over and that is in force in your link.

Either that or it's Heinlein's "Crazy Years".