Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Controlling Where Endnotes Go in Word 2010

I have decided that as much as I prefer footnotes, I really need to make this next book use endnotes.  While Word 2010 will convert footnotes to endnotes painlessly, I cannot seem to find a way to control where the endnotes go.  Ideally, they would go into a section labeled Notes, just before the Bibliography section.  But I have yet to find a way to do this.  Any hints?

UPDATE: Here's the instructions.  They are not very clear, but that's because this is an incredibly ugly hack.  I am absolutely sure that Microsoft never intended to do this.

6 comments:

John Cunningham said...

hi Clayton, have you considered Open Office? I do not do footnotes in it, so cannot say how easy they might be, but I will almost always go for an open source solution to avoid MicroSloth.

Clayton said...

I like Open Office, but I am not sure that it will convert to Kindle well enough.

asdf said...

I hate the monopoly that MS has, but I don't think OpenOffice meets the standards set by MSOffice. You don't have anything like Visual Basic to automate tasks.

Roger said...

I used an earlier version of Msft Word, and yes it was an ugly multistep hack. The default is to put the endnotes after the index! Just bit your tongue, and follow the instructions.

Roger said...

Yes, you have to do the ugly hack.

Epsilon Given said...

A nice thing about being a mathematician, is that I get to use LaTeX. Making structural changes, like where to put the footnotes or endnotes, is done very easily, as well as any mathematical formula. (Technically for mathematical formulas, I enerally consider LaTeX to be evil...but every math formula editor I've ever seen makes me realise that LaTeX is the worst formula editor, except for everything else.)

Of course, if you want to do something structural, like change a margin, you typically have to resort to ugly hacks! :-)

Having said all this, I don't know if there's a way to convert LaTeX to any sort of ebook format. Generally, LaTeX outputs to PostScript, PDF, and sort-of HTML (although if you don't have math in your document, HTML is more doable).